Plans for 2019: Dautzenlein Connections

7 January 2019

It’s a new year and Dautzenlein Connections is going to change things up a little bit. This comes as a result of six years of intense research into several aspects of the Cherokee Removal or “Trail of the Tears”, in North Georgia.

During this last year, 2018, Vogt-Dautzenlein Research and Documentation finished two research projects that resulted in two reports. The reports and presentations made to the  Georgia Department of Transportation, the United States Corps of Engineers, Cherokee County Historical Society, the Stamp Creek History and Heritage Center, and a round-table of academics and historians has culminated in our findings being introduced at two museums this Fall.

This year also saw the Spring 2018 issue of Georgia Backroads Magazine feature a story about our efforts and research to locate and preserve the lost site of Fort Buffington, one of the removal forts in North Georgia. Vogt-Dautzenlein is fortunate to be a Consulting Party for Department of Transportation, under Section 106 of the National Historic preservation Act, relating to two different highway projects that impact Removal sites or trails.

The last six years have been incredibly intense, research years. That last statement may seem odd if you think that research is sitting in a library, reading dusty, old books. Searching for lost historical people places and things, under the deadline of approaching bulldozers and doom, can be exhausting! This may not be an “Indiana Jones – Temple of Doom” type doom but one does experience the feeling of that famous boulder scene when the giant boulder rolls down towards “Indy”. For the last six years it seemed like the boulder was gaining ground on us.

In 2019, we are going to focus on the documentation part of Vogt-Dautzenlein Research and Documentation. In one of my talks I joked that, when it comes to history, “ A short pencil beats a long memory “.  In other words, Write it down before it gets lost, again. That’s what we are going to do over this next year.

We are going to publish some discoveries that we made over the last 6 years, right here on these pages, in an effort to  document and preserve the knowledge. We are also going to share some observations, musings, and perhaps even an opinion or two.

Keep checking back this year because there will be regular installments of new  and exciting information that we have recovered during our research.

 

 

 

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Today’s Newspaper Article: Mis-statements regarding the Trail of Tears in Bartow County, Georgia

Our research concerning one of the possible routes of the Trail of Tears through Bartow County , Georgia has just been incorrectly attributed, grossly misquoted, and woefully mis-stated in a Cartersville, Georgia, newspaper article.

To a researcher, this feels like the term “fake news” they talk about on TV , these days.

These kinds of errors, intentional or unintentional, create further mis-information and undermine years of careful and methodical research. Much of our time is spent correcting the mis-information of past historians, and others, that does not match newly discovered, primary source material.

Mistakes happen, we all make them. It just means that now we have even more mis-information to correct.

On the bright side, if this article inspires someone to uncover that last confirming or refuting piece of evidence, it will have had a beneficial effect.

We have spent the last 10 years gathering historical facts.

The shock of reading an article that has incorrect “facts” attributed to our research is mind-boggling to say the least!

Within the next week, our research report: Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota will be available via this site. Check back for the real story.

Link to Report.

 

 

 

Oops! We forgot to mention that Georgia Backroads magazine…

… has an article about some of our research in the Spring 2018 IssueThe article is about searching for the lost location of the Cherokee Removal fort, Fort Buffington,

Georgia Backroads is the premier magazine of Georgia history. If you are not familiar with the magazine… check it out, wherever magazines are sold. You’ll be glad you did.

The last entries here at dautzenlein.com have been about the actual routes and roads taken by the Cherokee from the two Cherokee County Removal forts. This research came directly out of our fort research and we were feverishly trying to discover definitive proof of the actual routes in time for the June 26th, 180 year commemoration of the Removal.

We had our attention on this endeavor and forgot to mention Georgia Backroads.

 

 

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PowerPoint Slides from “Decoding the Keyes Map” Presentation

We have no video or narration available from Tuesday’s meeting but we do have the PowerPoint slides for those of you who have been asking. They are somewhat self explanatory.

Click on link below and then click on first image to start the slide show, which is on a 10 second automatic cycle. The slides can be paused, replayed, etc.

*March 2019 note: The slide presentation has been deleted and the research is now available in the updated and expanded report, Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota, available here.

 

 

 

Dautzenlein Updates: February 2018

It has been some time since our last post and much has happened! It is time to report briefly on two topics.

First, we have been working with Georgia Department of Transportation to provide them research and artifacts related to the possible site of Fort Buffington in Cherokee County, Georgia. We had the opportunity to meet and make formal presentations to GDOT personnel and their contractor on two occasions, and have had many informal consultations over the last 5 months.

Their report is due out later this spring with recommendations and conclusions related to the highway improvement and its impact on historical resources along the corridor.

Last summer, GDOT archaeologists ask us to stop any onsite research until their process was complete and we agreed. The result is that we have little new to report but would like to acknowledge their sincere interest and cooperation in preserving history.

Second, the “extra” time gleaned from our reduced, on-site research gave us time to re-visit the Trail of Tears Round-up routes, here in Cherokee County. As previously posted, our research has suggested different Cherokee Removal routes than those shown and described in National Park Service maps and reports.

We now believe we have the documentation and dautzenleins to make firm cases for both routes; the Fort Buffington and the Sixes Cantonment routes to Fort Wool at New Echota .

Stay tuned for the public announcement of the routes, sometime within the next few weeks!

 

 

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179th Anniversary of the Start of the Removal of the Cherokee Native Americans from Georgia

179 years ago today, the federalized Volunteer Georgia Militia began collecting the Cherokee for removal from Georgia. Countless elements came together to create this chapter of history.

Clashes of cultures have unfortunately been common throughout history on this planet. Our quest to find the site of Fort Buffington, a relic or artifact of such a clash,  is on-going and hopefully nearing its successful end.  Our motivation for finding this symbol is to preserve it and create an environment that fosters understandings of the factors that led to this troubling period of American history.

Our posting last May 25th is also still relevant. (Scroll down to read it)

Become Part of the “Fort Buffington Discovery Team”

Help us “Connect the Dots” in Cherokee County before the Highway Destroys them Forever!

Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in Cherokee County history.

Much of the early history of Cherokee County, Georgia happened along Cumming Highway (SR 20). Early on it was called “Alabama Road” and many small communities were located along the road. One notable community was the Buffington community, about five miles east of Canton. This community developed around a Cherokee Removal fort named Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the earliest forts built related to the “Removal” or “Trail of Tears”, as it was later called.  Its location has been lost for over 100 years but we believe it has been located.  A conclusive archaeological excavation could take years and we do not have time on our side… the Highway 20 Improvement Program will destroy the site before excavation could be completed.

There is a chance that other evidence is out there to confirm the site and you may have it in an old album or shoe-box!

It’s Simple!

Please review the two lists below.

The first list is a list of family names that go back as far as the 1820’s or 1830’s.

The other list is a list of places or things that may be mentioned in family papers, or early newspapers, or captured in old photographs that you or a family member may have tucked away.  These may have been passed down through the years even if your present family name is different than those listed. Your relative in Oregon, New York, or Minnesota might have something. It could even be something you purchased at a Yard Sale!

If you feel that you have anything related to these names or places, please contact us. Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in connecting the dots and lines of Cherokee County history.

If you can connect a name from Column 1 with a reference to something from Column 2, you may have found a very special connection!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Email:  dautzenlein@aol.com

Go to:  dautzenlein.com

 


Family References

Buffington

Garrison

Thomas,   especially Jefferson Thomas

Moore

Tate

Wilson

Willson

Wilson and Cate

Wilbanks/Willbank

Perkins

Evans

Mullins

Posey

Maddox

Henson

Bagwell

Thrasher

Wood

Brewster

Reinhardt

McConnell

Donaldson

Cherokee

Places / Structures / Letters / Diaries/ Stories / Photographic References

“Old Fort”

“Indian Fort”

Fort Buffington

Buffington

Store

“Old Store”

Blacksmith

Post Office

Log cabin

Log house

Cemetery

Graveyard

Graves

Gin

Cotton Gin

Old Barn

Old Smokehouse

Old Shed

Harmony Church

“Old (Family) House”

Spring / Well

“Old Tree”

“Old Oak Tree”

Horse and Wagon

Horse and Building

Cherokee County, Georgia

“Cumming Highway”

“Orange Highway”

“Stockade”

Contacts us at: dautzenlein@aol.com  or leave a comment below. Include how we may contact you. Thank you!

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