Two Recent Paperback Book Releases from Vogt-Dautzenlein Research!

The Curious Disappearance of Fort Buffington, Cherokee County, Georgia 1838 – 2019

NEW, Updated, Expanded, and in Paperback! 

 

Curious Disappearnce of FB Front Cover - 10.30.2019 FINAL

This 136 page Paperback Edition of our earlier eBook contains many updates and over 60 photos, illustrations, index, and maps. The Curious Disappearance of Fort Buffington is written to explore information, some known and some hypothesized or speculated, surrounding one of the several lost Cherokee “Removal” forts, Fort Buffington. The fort is just one piece of a complex pattern of dots and lines that form a bigger picture. Fort Buffington is a haunting element of an entire, almost hidden or perhaps purposefully ignored, period of American history. Fort Buffington can be viewed as a symbol. Symbols capture our attention and pique our curiosities as they act to provide something we can see and perhaps touch about a subject otherwise lost or vaguely remembered. Symbols are links to our pasts and are objects of wonderment, and as many of us have experienced, lost things almost demand that they be found so there can be some kind of conclusion or resolution. While Fort Buffington is a symbol and artifact of this whole subject, interesting in and of itself, we invite you to use it as a starting point for a continuing adventure. Read, discover, make your own observations, and form your conclusions about Fort Buffington and the people connected to this whole period of American history. This paperback edition contains corrections, updates, and Appendices that discuss, among other things, the recent research and artifacts found during a survey undertaken to present evidence to Georgia Department of Transportation under the Section 106 portion of a highway improvement project which could threaten the possible site of Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington, a major Cherokee Removal Fort located about five miles east of Canton, Georgia, curiously “disappeared” shortly after its closure. The starting point of the Trail of Tears for many Cherokee, all traces of this stockade seem to have suddenly vanished from the countryside about 50 years after its abandonment, even though it had been a landmark for years. What happened to it? Where was the fort located? What might it have looked like? This updated, expanded,  and newly released paperback book of an earlier eBook contains facts and speculation, along with over 60 photos, illustrations, and maps.

Order Papaerback here.

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Our second book is an introduction into a forensic investigation of the Cherokee Removal and Trail of Tears.

 

Investigating the Legend: Curious Documents Echo Ominous Warnings from the Past

ITL cover 001

This Report is based on a Vogt-Dautzenlein presentation that addresses the Legend of the Cherokee Removal with a forensic look at some of the 180-200 year old documents related to the Removal and Trail of Tears.

One Dautzenlein Principle states: There is ALWAYS more to any dautzenlein* than first meets the eye! This could not be more true than it is here, as warnings and lessons from 1817 – 1838 are echoed in today’s headlines.

The documented information in this report may affect you as it did one presentation attendee, who reported, ” It shook me to my core!”

Does the real genesis of a two hundred year old legend foretell the future as well as it captures the past? Researching and documenting history is an interesting and challenging undertaking. Recovering information and then working to understand how it fits into the existing mosaic of history is the work of archaeologists, historians, anthropologists, and others. Museums undertake the care, preservation, and display of the artifacts of history so people have the opportunity to see and learn about our past. Books, movies, lectures, and artwork all strive to convey different aspects of history. Some of these aspects are interesting, others evoke emotions, some are fantasy, others teach us lessons, and some excite our curiosities.Sometimes researchers recover information that they were not intending to find. That is what happened here. Investigating the Legend of the Trail of Tears

 

* A Dautzenlein is the connection between the ” dots and lines” of history.

Order Paperback here.

PowerPoint Slides from “Decoding the Keyes Map” Presentation

We have no video or narration available from Tuesday’s meeting but we do have the PowerPoint slides for those of you who have been asking. They are somewhat self explanatory.

Click on link below and then click on first image to start the slide show, which is on a 10 second automatic cycle. The slides can be paused, replayed, etc.

*March 2019 note: The slide presentation has been deleted and the research is now available in the updated and expanded report, Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota, available here.

 

 

 

Become Part of the “Fort Buffington Discovery Team”

Help us “Connect the Dots” in Cherokee County before the Highway Destroys them Forever!

Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in Cherokee County history.

Much of the early history of Cherokee County, Georgia happened along Cumming Highway (SR 20). Early on it was called “Alabama Road” and many small communities were located along the road. One notable community was the Buffington community, about five miles east of Canton. This community developed around a Cherokee Removal fort named Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the earliest forts built related to the “Removal” or “Trail of Tears”, as it was later called.  Its location has been lost for over 100 years but we believe it has been located.  A conclusive archaeological excavation could take years and we do not have time on our side… the Highway 20 Improvement Program will destroy the site before excavation could be completed.

There is a chance that other evidence is out there to confirm the site and you may have it in an old album or shoe-box!

It’s Simple!

Please review the two lists below.

The first list is a list of family names that go back as far as the 1820’s or 1830’s.

The other list is a list of places or things that may be mentioned in family papers, or early newspapers, or captured in old photographs that you or a family member may have tucked away.  These may have been passed down through the years even if your present family name is different than those listed. Your relative in Oregon, New York, or Minnesota might have something. It could even be something you purchased at a Yard Sale!

If you feel that you have anything related to these names or places, please contact us. Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in connecting the dots and lines of Cherokee County history.

If you can connect a name from Column 1 with a reference to something from Column 2, you may have found a very special connection!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Email:  dautzenlein@aol.com

Go to:  dautzenlein.com

 


Family References

Buffington

Garrison

Thomas,   especially Jefferson Thomas

Moore

Tate

Wilson

Willson

Wilson and Cate

Wilbanks/Willbank

Perkins

Evans

Mullins

Posey

Maddox

Henson

Bagwell

Thrasher

Wood

Brewster

Reinhardt

McConnell

Donaldson

Cherokee

Places / Structures / Letters / Diaries/ Stories / Photographic References

“Old Fort”

“Indian Fort”

Fort Buffington

Buffington

Store

“Old Store”

Blacksmith

Post Office

Log cabin

Log house

Cemetery

Graveyard

Graves

Gin

Cotton Gin

Old Barn

Old Smokehouse

Old Shed

Harmony Church

“Old (Family) House”

Spring / Well

“Old Tree”

“Old Oak Tree”

Horse and Wagon

Horse and Building

Cherokee County, Georgia

“Cumming Highway”

“Orange Highway”

“Stockade”

Contacts us at: dautzenlein@aol.com  or leave a comment below. Include how we may contact you. Thank you!

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Historic Landmark Lost!

Sadly, Cherokee County, Georgia has lost one of its earliest historical landmark structures.

The Major John McConnell, Jr. house, built before the Cherokee Removal, has been torn down.

It overlooked McConnell land holdings, in the Hickory Flat area, that stretched from near New Light and Hickory Roads on into town where its earlier counterpart, the McConnell/Garrison/ Worley/Quarles house stood near the intersection of East Cherokee and Highway 140. John had followed his son, Eli, to the area.

When Brigadier General Eli McConnell and his brother-in-law, John B. Garrison moved into the Cherokee Nation in 1829-30 and co-founded Hickory Flat, they were the first settlers in the area. In fact, they were among the first settlers in the Cherokee Nation. McConnell and Garrison established homes, families, Post Office, and trade here at the crossroads of several early trails.

Eli’s two story house, first depicted on drawings from the 1832 land survey, had been Hickory Flat’s main historical building until it was lost to development some years ago. Now, John’s house, very similar architecturally, has been torn down. Neither house sparked enough attention to have them preserved.

It is interesting that “old” buildings, still within the childhood memories of folks, seem to have more importance than buildings that pre-date one’s memory.

All this is nothing new in the grand scheme of things, it’s just sad to see. Things do fade into history.

IMGP3784compGoing… going…

IMGP4725 crop

Gone… Forever.  1834 – 2015

 The Dautzenlein Theory states, “ Dautzenleins* persist or decay based on the original intention of someone and the continued attention or inattention of others.” Those Dautzenleins perceived as more valuable will tend to become bigger and more solid; those perceived as less valuable or undesirable will fade and “disappear.”

 John McConnell’s original intention to have a house must have been very strong… it   lasted 181 years!

*Dautzenleins are the connections of people or things, places, dates, and events.

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Update re: Trail of Tears Route from Fort Buffington to Fort Wool confirmed.

Update re: Trail of Tears Route from Fort Buffington to Fort Wool confirmed.

14 August 2015

Documentary evidence confirming that the Fort Buffington Cherokees took a northern route to Fort Wool rather than the more southern route taken by the Sixes Cherokees has been established.

For some years we have believed this to be the case but did not have the Dautzenleins connected. The “dots and lines” are now connected!

County land records, Cherokee County Court records, eye-witness reports, maps, travel times, and military records connect to give us a good picture of this portion of the Trail of Tears.

While most sources, like the National Park Service and Trail of Tears Association have shown the Trail going south and then west from the Canton area, we now know it went north and then west to arrive near New Echota and Fort Wool.

The leg of this route beyond Reinhardt’s still needs more documentation but there were only two major routes across at that time, one through Pine Log and the other through Sallacoa.

Now more data may be found as the Dautzenleins of this route are observed and connected to fill out history in this area.

Details and references are in our book: The Curious Disappearance of Fort Buffington (3rd  Edition, September 2015).

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Trail of Tears Routes from Fort Buffington and Sixes to Fort Wool

The question recently came up:  What routes did The Cherokee take from Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment as they started on the Trail of Tears?  We put together several references and now have a good view of how they traveled according to the National Park Service and another possibility.

Trail of Tears Routes from Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment

The NPS suggests that the Fort Buffington Cherokee traveled west on old Alabama Road to Donaldson’s Ferry on the Etowah, north of Cherokee Court House / Etowah / Canton @ Land Lot 167/14/2.

Once across the Etowah, they would have traveled west on a road (that was layed out in 1834/35) and followed an early trail called Warford’s Trail (Wofford’s Trail) that went to Wofford’s Cross Roads.

The Trail would have turned southwest to join up with the road that ran from Downings Ferry to Cassville.

Two trails, sometimes called Upper and Lower Sweetwater, join at Laffingal and then head west, then northwest to Cassville. In 1838, Lower Sweetwater was part of the old Alabama Road, sometimes called Downing’s Ferry Road, as it continued west of Canton, across the Etowah at Downing’s Ferry and on to Laffingal and points west.

From Cassville the Trail ran for awhile on the road “from Cassville to Coosawattee” and then branched, just north of the South Fork of Two Run Creek, northwest to Adairsville and on to Calhoun and Fort Wool near New Town / New Echota .

The Sixes Cherokee crossed the Etowah at Brookes Ferry on Land Lot 216/15/2. This was north of Sixes mines, now the Bridgemill area. This route would have given the Cherokee one last look at the Sixes Village with the large Town House at its center as the trail climbed out of the river lands and up to old Alabama Road / Downing’s Ferry Rd on the same route to Cassville.

Dautzenlein Connections also point to an alternative possibility that Fort Buffington Cherokees and Sixes Cherokees took different routes to Fort Wool.

The Sixes Cherokees probably took the route above, starting at Brooke’s Ferry and following Downing’s Ferry / Alabama Road west to Ft. Wool.

The Buffington Cherokee may have taken a different, more northerly route from Donaldson’s Ferry, at Canton, northwest thorough what is now Waleska, on to Pine Log, and up to Ft. Wool. We’ve coined this the “140 Route” as it generally follows Georgia Route 140 from Martin’s Ferry, a gateway into the Cherokee Nation on the Chattahoochee River, up to Canton and all the way to Adairsville near Calhoun. Court documents from 1836 mention this “road from Canton to New Town” and its proximity to L. W. Reinhardt’s.

More research is needed to definitively map the routes but these are the two possibilities that are the most probable.

Note: See later post with Update about this!

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The Curious Disappearance of Fort Buffington, Cherokee County, Georgia 1838 – 2019

NEW, Updated, Expanded, and in Paperback! 

Curious Disappearnce of FB Front Cover - 10.30.2019 FINAL

 

Fort Buffington, a major Cherokee Removal Fort located about five miles east of Canton, Georgia, curiously “disappeared” shortly after its closure. The starting point of the Trail of Tears for many Cherokee, all traces of this stockade seem to have suddenly vanished from the countryside about 50 years after its abandonment, even though it had been a landmark for years. What happened to it? Where was the fort located? What might it have looked like? This updated, expanded,  and newly released paperback book of an earlier eBook contains facts and speculation, along with over 50 photos, illustrations, and maps.  Order Papaerback here.

 

———————————————————————————–

 

Investigating the Legend: Curious Documents Echo Ominous Warnings from the Past

 

ITL cover 001

This Report is based on a Vogt-Dautzenlein presentation that addresses the Legend of the Cherokee Removal with a forensic look at some of the 180-200 year old documents related to the Removal and Trail of Tears.

One Dautzenlein Principle states: There is ALWAYS more to any dautzenlein than first meets the eye! This could not be more true than it is here, as the warnings and lessons of 1838  are echoed in today’s headlines.

The documented information in this report may affect you, as it did one person who reported, ” It shook me to my core!”

Order Paperback here.

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Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota

Vogt-Dautzenlein Research Report, available in paperback :

Color Cover

The Cherokee Removal, often referred to as the Trail of Tears, is one of the most complex, confusing, and heartbreaking periods of American history. While much has been written about it, much still remains a mystery. The exact locations of all but a few of the more than twenty Removal forts and posts have been lost to time. Consequently, most of the initial Trail of Tears routes taken by the Cherokee and the soldiers have also been lost.This report presents the latest information about two of the Trails connected to two Removal sites in Cherokee County, Georgia. The purpose of this report is: To document newly recovered historical information; present it, as found; and report the findings in an organized form. The report also proposes some hypotheses.The style of the report is designed to be a resource for researchers and still interesting to any “history nut”.

Order paperback report here.

 

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 The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona: the Sixes, Cherokee Mills, Little River Area of Cherokee County, Georgia

“Today, looking out across the broad expanse oaaaaaaaf the Lake Allatoona reservoir, most people just see a big lake. One might have difficulty imagining how this area looked before the dam was built, with the Little River flowing down to join the larger Etowah River at their confluence.  A confluence is the spot where two rivers meet and flow together. Lake Allatoona is formed by the dammed up waters of these two ancient, winding rivers. Down the Little River toward the Etowah River, just out a short distance from the ends of the docks behind Little River Grill,  is the former location of historic Cherokee Mills and its dam. On June 16, 1864, a Civil War skirmish took place just a few yards from here. The primary focus of this book covers a radius of about two miles from the central point where the two rivers still flow together, deep below the surface of Lake Allatoona. This is considered the “Sixes “ area, named for a Cherokee village once located here. Photos, illustrations and maps assist the reader to appreciate the area and its history. Order paperback here.


 

Dautzenleins: Making Sense of Things

Dautzenlein making sens of things .1 Look at something around you. Whatever you see, there is more to it than first meets the eye. There are “hidden” connections waiting to be discovered. Dautzenleins are these connections, the vehicles to unlock the doors of discovery and understanding.

Dautzenleins (pronounced “dots -n- lines”) are the connections of people or things, places, dates, and events.

Dautzenleins are invitations to look and see “what else” is around you; to discover the “dots and lines” that connect everything. Discovery makes life exciting! Whether one discovers a new person, place, or idea, or discovers another way to look at something, it leads to understanding. All of life and history is a continuing discovery of the Dautzenleins around us. This book presents the basics of a new way of viewing things so you can begin to understand and use the power of the Dautzenlein.  We are constantly impacted by people, things, places, and events of the past and present, and how they relate to each other and to us. Some of these relationships are easy to see, while others often go unseen, almost hidden, even though they are very relevant and intriguing pieces of the picture. If we view people, places, and artifacts as “Dots”, and view the rivers, roads, ideas, communications, and commerce as “Lines”, we can connect the “Dots” and “Lines” and discover some amazing and interesting aspects of history!  Our “Rule”: No dot exists without, at least, one line connected to it and no line exists without at least two dots connected to it. From the above rule, we see that the smallest Dautzenlein unit is: two dots connected by one line.  Discover any connection, and more dots and lines will begin to fall into place from there… just start connecting! Order  eBook Here.

Dautzenlein eBooks for smartphone, tablet, Kindle, or computer are available from Amazon.com. The books can be read on your device using their free downloadable reader applications found in the right hand column of the book order page. For more information about each books, click on “Order eBook here” links.

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