Victoria Harbor Marina – Victoria Landing – Lovingood’s Bridge – Historical Connections

Victoria Harbor Marina is a busy place on the shore of Lake Allatoona. How did it get its name?

The name Victoria comes from the name of a town or community that used to exist about a mile up the road from the marina at the crossroad. The town was located on what was then called Lovingood Road which went down to Lovingood’s Bridge and across the Etowah River.This road is now called Victoria Landing Dr.

The Etowah River is the main river that forms Lake Allatoona. Lovingood’s Bridge spanned the river almost straight out from the restaurant at the marina. Lovingood’s Bridge was mentioned often in Civil War dispatches as it was one of the few bridges across the river at that time and was used by both Union and Confederate forces during Sherman’s march through the area..

Samuel Lovingood, Jr owned the bridge, ferry, and mill near here. Samuel came to the area in the 1850’s. After the bridge was washed away in a flood, Lovingood operated a ferry at this location. The place where the ferry came to the shore was called a “landing”. The one here was called Lovingood or Victoria Landing.

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The Little River Marina – Cherokee Mills – Historical Connections

Many people who know of Little River Marina on Lake Allatoona in Cherokee County, Georgia have no idea about the amazing history of that very spot and the region around it.

To most it looks like an everyday section along the shores of Lake Allatoona. Who would suspect that they are standing on a spot where a Civil War skirmish took place, or that Cherokee crossed the Little River here on their way along the Trail of Tears, or that ancient Indians lived here before it became part of the Cherokee Nation?

Would one know that one of the earliest mills in the area, one that provided flour for the gold miners up the road at Sixes and Cherokee Mines, was located just a few hundred feet down river from the present bridge? McConnell’s Mill, later called Cherokee Mills, was located just beyond the docks behind Little River Grill.

There is so much history to be discovered in this area. Get details and stories here.

 

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New e-Book Release from Dautzenlein Publications!

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Dautzenlein Publications has just released the ebook: The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona: The Sixes, Cherokee Mills, Little River Area.

It is available from Amazon at:http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-History-Lake-Allatoona-Cherokee-ebook/dp/B00HHE3B3A/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1387890474&sr=1-1&keywords=hidden+history+of+lake+allatoona

“Today, looking out across the broad expanse of the Lake Allatoona reservoir, most people just see a big lake. One might have difficulty imagining how this area looked before the dam was built, with the Little River flowing down to join the larger Etowah River at their confluence.

 * A confluence is the spot where two rivers meet and flow together.

 Lake Allatoona is formed by the dammed up waters of these two ancient, winding rivers.

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Looking down the Little River, from behind the Little River Grill, toward the Etowah River where an old Indian Village once stood. Just out a short distance from the ends of the docks is the former location of historic Cherokee Mills and its dam, and on June 16, 1864, a Civil War skirmish took place just a few yards from here.

 The primary focus of this book covers a radius of about two miles from the central point where the two rivers still flow together, deep below the surface of Lake Allatoona.  This is considered the “Sixes “ area, named for a Cherokee village once located here.

 The confluence is an unusual spot, surrounded by an incredible amount of rich history. It is a small epicenter or focal point of Dautzenleins spanning out and touching almost every aspect of North Georgia and its people – past, present, and future.

 As you will soon find out, places like Sixes, Cherokee Mills, and Little River are keys to understanding the history of this area.”

 

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Introduction to Upcoming Book: “The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona, Cherokee County , Georgia” from Dautzenlein Publications

Our new book looks at one of the most history-rich spots in Northwest Georgia. The “Dots and Lines” of history found here, when connected, were found to span 10,000 years and connect all the way to California!

Some of the “Dots and Lines” are: Sixes, Cherokee Mills, McConnell’s Mill, Woodstock Culture, Gold Rush, Civil War, Little River, Etowah River, Lake Allatoona, Cherokee, Trail of Tears, Removal, Civil War skirmish.

Introduction:

 Dautzenlein Publications™:

Look at something around you.  Whatever you see, there’s more to it than what first meets the eye.  There are “hidden” connections waiting to be discovered. 

Dautzenleins are these connections, the vehicles to unlock the doors of discovery and understanding.

Dautzenleins {pronounced   “dots -‘n- lines” ) are the connections of people, places, dates, and events.

Dautzenlein books are invitations to look and see “what else” is around you; to discover the “dots and lines” that connect everything.

 Discovery makes life exciting!

Whether one discovers a new person, place, or idea; or discovers another way to look at something, it leads to understanding. All of life and history is a continuing discovery of the Dautzenleins around us.

*Dautzenleins – pronounced   “dots -‘n- lines” – are the connections of people, places, dates, and events.

Addendum at back of book:

The “Dots and Lines” of History.

We’ve all played the game “Connect the Dots” where a piece of paper has a large, random, group of numbered dots on it and when lines are drawn connecting the dots … a picture emerges. The simple “Rule” of that game is: Draw lines connecting the dots, in numerical order, starting with #1.

Had we been given the piece of paper and not known the “rule”, we might have carefully examine each dot on the page, individually, without connecting them with lines, without searching for the next dot to connect, and then wondered … what good is this?

History (and all of life) is like that piece of paper with many random dots on it… only the dots aren’t numbered! 

“NOT NUMBERED!!! How can we play the game and connect the dots if the dots aren’t numbered?”  Well, that’s a good question!

 We’ve heard the term “connecting the dots” which means to observe the elements of a situation or event, investigate their inter-connections, and discover the “real story” or the motivations surrounding the event so we can get the “big picture”.

History is the record and documentation of the people, places, and events of the past and how they relate to each other and to us. Some of these relationships are easy to see, while others often go unseen, even though they are very relevant and intriguing pieces of the picture.

If we view people, places, and artifacts as “Dots”, and view the rivers, roads, ideas, communications, and commerce as “Lines”, we can connect the “Dots” and “Lines” and discover some amazing and interesting aspects of history!

Our “Rule”: No dot exists without, at least, one line connected to it and no line exists without dots connected to it.

These connections serve as the “missing” numbers for each dot by connecting the dot to the next numberless dot.

Discover any connections… and more dots and lines will begin to fall into place from there… just start connecting!

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