Now Available in Paperback! Hidden History of Lake Allatoona

By popular demand, Hidden History of Lake Allatoona: The Sixes, Cherokee Mills, Little River Area has now been released as a paperback and is available here from Amazon.com.

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Plans for 2019: Dautzenlein Connections

7 January 2019

It’s a new year and Dautzenlein Connections is going to change things up a little bit. This comes as a result of six years of intense research into several aspects of the Cherokee Removal or “Trail of the Tears”, in North Georgia.

During this last year, 2018, Vogt-Dautzenlein Research and Documentation finished two research projects that resulted in two reports. The reports and presentations made to the  Georgia Department of Transportation, the United States Corps of Engineers, Cherokee County Historical Society, the Stamp Creek History and Heritage Center, and a round-table of academics and historians has culminated in our findings being introduced at two museums this Fall.

This year also saw the Spring 2018 issue of Georgia Backroads Magazine feature a story about our efforts and research to locate and preserve the lost site of Fort Buffington, one of the removal forts in North Georgia. Vogt-Dautzenlein is fortunate to be a Consulting Party for Department of Transportation, under Section 106 of the National Historic preservation Act, relating to two different highway projects that impact Removal sites or trails.

The last six years have been incredibly intense, research years. That last statement may seem odd if you think that research is sitting in a library, reading dusty, old books. Searching for lost historical people places and things, under the deadline of approaching bulldozers and doom, can be exhausting! This may not be an “Indiana Jones – Temple of Doom” type doom but one does experience the feeling of that famous boulder scene when the giant boulder rolls down towards “Indy”. For the last six years it seemed like the boulder was gaining ground on us.

In 2019, we are going to focus on the documentation part of Vogt-Dautzenlein Research and Documentation. In one of my talks I joked that, when it comes to history, “ A short pencil beats a long memory “.  In other words, Write it down before it gets lost, again. That’s what we are going to do over this next year.

We are going to publish some discoveries that we made over the last 6 years, right here on these pages, in an effort to  document and preserve the knowledge. We are also going to share some observations, musings, and perhaps even an opinion or two.

Keep checking back this year because there will be regular installments of new  and exciting information that we have recovered during our research.

 

 

 

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Oops! We forgot to mention that Georgia Backroads magazine…

… has an article about some of our research in the Spring 2018 IssueThe article is about searching for the lost location of the Cherokee Removal fort, Fort Buffington,

Georgia Backroads is the premier magazine of Georgia history. If you are not familiar with the magazine… check it out, wherever magazines are sold. You’ll be glad you did.

The last entries here at dautzenlein.com have been about the actual routes and roads taken by the Cherokee from the two Cherokee County Removal forts. This research came directly out of our fort research and we were feverishly trying to discover definitive proof of the actual routes in time for the June 26th, 180 year commemoration of the Removal.

We had our attention on this endeavor and forgot to mention Georgia Backroads.

 

 

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Hemorrhoids confirm historian’s hypothesis

How a tiny, “insignificant” Dot can “change a course” of history as it was known!

(A Dot in Dautzenlein lingo is a person, place, date, or event. Dautzenlein means “connecting the dots and lines”.)

Researchers are tasked with observing and revisiting information to discover more connections and other possibilities.

So often historians hear: “We really don’t have any significant information or relevant history handed down through our family.” or “All we have is an old letter or photo.”   To anyone who has historical documents, writings, maps, sketches, or photographs – please be aware that even the smallest thing can hold the biggest clue!

Here’s a true story about how extraordinary a mundane statement can be to a researcher.

In an appendix of John Latty’s book, Carrying off the Cherokee, there is a note about a soldier’s complaint that he got piles (hemorrhoids) while serving in the militia in June of 1838. Standing alone, this certainly adds some color to the drab palette of military records but that note dramatically adds a technicolor scene to our Dautzenlein research into the Trail of Tears as it relates to Fort Buffington.

Vogt-Dautzenlein has held that the Cherokee Trail of Tears from Fort Buffington to Fort Wool at New Echota took a different route than that proposed by the National Park Service and Trail of Tears Association, as shown on their maps and written in their descriptions.

This hypothesis was not taken very seriously as there was no known supporting evidence.  Vogt-Dautzenlein has now connected the dots, with evidence, from Fort Buffington to Donaldson’s Ferry and then to Waleska (see our earlier post and book) and NOW to Pine Log Town northwest of Waleska.

Thanks to this short “hemorrhoid” reference, a Fort Buffington solder, James Thrasher, is placed at Pine Log Town, about June 1, 1838. Since the Cherokee and their guards left Fort Buffington sometime between May 30 and June 2, it follows that Thrasher was probably on his way with the Cherokee to Fort Wool and that the course of the Trail ran through Pine Log Town after stopping near Waleska on the first night. The dots all connect!

In the grand scheme of things this does not alter the rotation of the earth on its axis but even seemingly inconsequential things can help connect some dots toward a fuller understanding of the Removal in North Georgia.

 

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Update on possible Fort Buffington site investigation

It has been a year since Vogt-Dautzenlein discovered the possible site of  Fort Buffington, in Cherokee County, Georgia.

Artifacts found, while consistent with the time period are not definitive by themselves, as daily life at a  volunteer militia frontier fort did not differ radically from that of most settlers. Removal forts were not heavily militarized since the Cherokee were not hostile. In some locales, the militia soldiers were not armed much more than a week before the collection action started. The volunteers were simply settlers who volunteered to serve under their local militia commanders. Most of Buffington’s outfit came from Hall County with some Cherokee County men volunteering once the post was established.

Landowners have granted permission to begin more extensive archaeological investigations that should lead to more definitive findings.

 

Vogt-Dautzenlein locates Historic Site believed to be Fort Buffington!

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Vogt-Dautzenlein Discovers Probable Location of Fort Buffington!

On August 23, 2015, documentary evidence was Dautzenleined (connected using Dautzenlein procedures) and it indicated a specific location. It is very exciting when Dautzenleins predict a location and it leads to discoveries!

Within two days, this location produced artifacts of the time period, type, and quantity to suggest that this is the probable site of the long lost Cherokee Removal fort – Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the main forts along what is now called the Trail of Tears.

While the fort structure appears to have been relatively small, the site itself covers several acres and looks to have another adjoining “campus” possibly used by the Cherokee when they were collected for Removal.

Assuming this is the site, it clears up a lot of confusion that has existed about the fort and its location.

The sites and properties are privately owned by a number of individuals. No further information will be released at this time, as per landowners’ wishes.

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Historic Landmark Lost!

Sadly, Cherokee County, Georgia has lost one of its earliest historical landmark structures.

The Major John McConnell, Jr. house, built before the Cherokee Removal, has been torn down.

It overlooked McConnell land holdings, in the Hickory Flat area, that stretched from near New Light and Hickory Roads on into town where its earlier counterpart, the McConnell/Garrison/ Worley/Quarles house stood near the intersection of East Cherokee and Highway 140. John had followed his son, Eli, to the area.

When Brigadier General Eli McConnell and his brother-in-law, John B. Garrison moved into the Cherokee Nation in 1829-30 and co-founded Hickory Flat, they were the first settlers in the area. In fact, they were among the first settlers in the Cherokee Nation. McConnell and Garrison established homes, families, Post Office, and trade here at the crossroads of several early trails.

Eli’s two story house, first depicted on drawings from the 1832 land survey, had been Hickory Flat’s main historical building until it was lost to development some years ago. Now, John’s house, very similar architecturally, has been torn down. Neither house sparked enough attention to have them preserved.

It is interesting that “old” buildings, still within the childhood memories of folks, seem to have more importance than buildings that pre-date one’s memory.

All this is nothing new in the grand scheme of things, it’s just sad to see. Things do fade into history.

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Gone… Forever.  1834 – 2015

 The Dautzenlein Theory states, “ Dautzenleins* persist or decay based on the original intention of someone and the continued attention or inattention of others.” Those Dautzenleins perceived as more valuable will tend to become bigger and more solid; those perceived as less valuable or undesirable will fade and “disappear.”

 John McConnell’s original intention to have a house must have been very strong… it   lasted 181 years!

*Dautzenleins are the connections of people or things, places, dates, and events.

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