Become Part of the “Fort Buffington Discovery Team”

Help us “Connect the Dots” in Cherokee County before the Highway Destroys them Forever!

Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in Cherokee County history.

Much of the early history of Cherokee County, Georgia happened along Cumming Highway (SR 20). Early on it was called “Alabama Road” and many small communities were located along the road. One notable community was the Buffington community, about five miles east of Canton. This community developed around a Cherokee Removal fort named Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the earliest forts built related to the “Removal” or “Trail of Tears”, as it was later called.  Its location has been lost for over 100 years but we believe it has been located.  A conclusive archaeological excavation could take years and we do not have time on our side… the Highway 20 Improvement Program will destroy the site before excavation could be completed.

There is a chance that other evidence is out there to confirm the site and you may have it in an old album or shoe-box!

It’s Simple!

Please review the two lists below.

The first list is a list of family names that go back as far as the 1820’s or 1830’s.

The other list is a list of places or things that may be mentioned in family papers, or early newspapers, or captured in old photographs that you or a family member may have tucked away.  These may have been passed down through the years even if your present family name is different than those listed. Your relative in Oregon, New York, or Minnesota might have something. It could even be something you purchased at a Yard Sale!

If you feel that you have anything related to these names or places, please contact us. Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in connecting the dots and lines of Cherokee County history.

If you can connect a name from Column 1 with a reference to something from Column 2, you may have found a very special connection!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Email:  dautzenlein@aol.com

Go to:  dautzenlein.com

 


Family References

Buffington

Garrison

Thomas,   especially Jefferson Thomas

Moore

Tate

Wilson

Willson

Wilson and Cate

Wilbanks/Willbank

Perkins

Evans

Mullins

Posey

Maddox

Henson

Bagwell

Thrasher

Wood

Brewster

Reinhardt

McConnell

Donaldson

Cherokee

Places / Structures / Letters / Diaries/ Stories / Photographic References

“Old Fort”

“Indian Fort”

Fort Buffington

Buffington

Store

“Old Store”

Blacksmith

Post Office

Log cabin

Log house

Cemetery

Graveyard

Graves

Gin

Cotton Gin

Old Barn

Old Smokehouse

Old Shed

Harmony Church

“Old (Family) House”

Spring / Well

“Old Tree”

“Old Oak Tree”

Horse and Wagon

Horse and Building

Cherokee County, Georgia

“Cumming Highway”

“Orange Highway”

“Stockade”

Contacts us at: dautzenlein@aol.com  or leave a comment below. Include how we may contact you. Thank you!

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Hemorrhoids confirm historian’s hypothesis

How a tiny, “insignificant” Dot can “change a course” of history as it was known!

(A Dot in Dautzenlein lingo is a person, place, date, or event. Dautzenlein means “connecting the dots and lines”.)

Researchers are tasked with observing and revisiting information to discover more connections and other possibilities.

So often historians hear: “We really don’t have any significant information or relevant history handed down through our family.” or “All we have is an old letter or photo.”   To anyone who has historical documents, writings, maps, sketches, or photographs – please be aware that even the smallest thing can hold the biggest clue!

Here’s a true story about how extraordinary a mundane statement can be to a researcher.

In an appendix of John Latty’s book, Carrying off the Cherokee, there is a note about a soldier’s complaint that he got piles (hemorrhoids) while serving in the militia in June of 1838. Standing alone, this certainly adds some color to the drab palette of military records but that note dramatically adds a technicolor scene to our Dautzenlein research into the Trail of Tears as it relates to Fort Buffington.

Vogt-Dautzenlein has held that the Cherokee Trail of Tears from Fort Buffington to Fort Wool at New Echota took a different route than that proposed by the National Park Service and Trail of Tears Association, as shown on their maps and written in their descriptions.

This hypothesis was not taken very seriously as there was no known supporting evidence.  Vogt-Dautzenlein has now connected the dots, with evidence, from Fort Buffington to Donaldson’s Ferry and then to Waleska (see our earlier post and book) and NOW to Pine Log Town northwest of Waleska.

Thanks to this short “hemorrhoid” reference, a Fort Buffington solder, James Thrasher, is placed at Pine Log Town, about June 1, 1838. Since the Cherokee and their guards left Fort Buffington sometime between May 30 and June 2, it follows that Thrasher was probably on his way with the Cherokee to Fort Wool and that the course of the Trail ran through Pine Log Town after stopping near Waleska on the first night. The dots all connect!

In the grand scheme of things this does not alter the rotation of the earth on its axis but even seemingly inconsequential things can help connect some dots toward a fuller understanding of the Removal in North Georgia.

 

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Update on possible Fort Buffington site investigation

It has been a year since Vogt-Dautzenlein discovered the possible site of  Fort Buffington, in Cherokee County, Georgia.

Artifacts found, while consistent with the time period are not definitive by themselves, as daily life at a  volunteer militia frontier fort did not differ radically from that of most settlers. Removal forts were not heavily militarized since the Cherokee were not hostile. In some locales, the militia soldiers were not armed much more than a week before the collection action started. The volunteers were simply settlers who volunteered to serve under their local militia commanders. Most of Buffington’s outfit came from Hall County with some Cherokee County men volunteering once the post was established.

Landowners have granted permission to begin more extensive archaeological investigations that should lead to more definitive findings.

 

Historic Landmark Lost!

Sadly, Cherokee County, Georgia has lost one of its earliest historical landmark structures.

The Major John McConnell, Jr. house, built before the Cherokee Removal, has been torn down.

It overlooked McConnell land holdings, in the Hickory Flat area, that stretched from near New Light and Hickory Roads on into town where its earlier counterpart, the McConnell/Garrison/ Worley/Quarles house stood near the intersection of East Cherokee and Highway 140. John had followed his son, Eli, to the area.

When Brigadier General Eli McConnell and his brother-in-law, John B. Garrison moved into the Cherokee Nation in 1829-30 and co-founded Hickory Flat, they were the first settlers in the area. In fact, they were among the first settlers in the Cherokee Nation. McConnell and Garrison established homes, families, Post Office, and trade here at the crossroads of several early trails.

Eli’s two story house, first depicted on drawings from the 1832 land survey, had been Hickory Flat’s main historical building until it was lost to development some years ago. Now, John’s house, very similar architecturally, has been torn down. Neither house sparked enough attention to have them preserved.

It is interesting that “old” buildings, still within the childhood memories of folks, seem to have more importance than buildings that pre-date one’s memory.

All this is nothing new in the grand scheme of things, it’s just sad to see. Things do fade into history.

IMGP3784compGoing… going…

IMGP4725 crop

Gone… Forever.  1834 – 2015

 The Dautzenlein Theory states, “ Dautzenleins* persist or decay based on the original intention of someone and the continued attention or inattention of others.” Those Dautzenleins perceived as more valuable will tend to become bigger and more solid; those perceived as less valuable or undesirable will fade and “disappear.”

 John McConnell’s original intention to have a house must have been very strong… it   lasted 181 years!

*Dautzenleins are the connections of people or things, places, dates, and events.

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Victoria Harbor Marina – Victoria Landing – Lovingood’s Bridge – Historical Connections

Victoria Harbor Marina is a busy place on the shore of Lake Allatoona. How did it get its name?

The name Victoria comes from the name of a town or community that used to exist about a mile up the road from the marina at the crossroad. The town was located on what was then called Lovingood Road which went down to Lovingood’s Bridge and across the Etowah River.This road is now called Victoria Landing Dr.

The Etowah River is the main river that forms Lake Allatoona. Lovingood’s Bridge spanned the river almost straight out from the restaurant at the marina. Lovingood’s Bridge was mentioned often in Civil War dispatches as it was one of the few bridges across the river at that time and was used by both Union and Confederate forces during Sherman’s march through the area..

Samuel Lovingood, Jr owned the bridge, ferry, and mill near here. Samuel came to the area in the 1850’s. After the bridge was washed away in a flood, Lovingood operated a ferry at this location. The place where the ferry came to the shore was called a “landing”. The one here was called Lovingood or Victoria Landing.

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Welcome to Dautzenlein Connections

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The Bookstore:

Learn more about Northern Georgia local and regional history, and how to more efficiently research things yourself.

 

 

The Curious Disappearance of Fort Buffington, Cherokee County, Georgia 1838 – 2019

NEW, Updated, Expanded, and in Paperback! 

Curious Disappearnce of FB Front Cover - 10.30.2019 FINAL

 

Fort Buffington, a major Cherokee Removal Fort located about five miles east of Canton, Georgia, curiously “disappeared” shortly after its closure. The starting point of the Trail of Tears for many Cherokee, all traces of this stockade seem to have suddenly vanished from the countryside about 50 years after its abandonment, even though it had been a landmark for years. What happened to it? Where was the fort located? What might it have looked like? This updated, expanded,  and newly released paperback book of an earlier eBook contains facts and speculation, along with over 50 photos, illustrations, and maps.  Order Papaerback here.

 

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Investigating the Legend: Curious Documents Echo Ominous Warnings from the Past

 

ITL cover 001

This Report is based on a Vogt-Dautzenlein presentation that addresses the Legend of the Cherokee Removal with a forensic look at some of the 180-200 year old documents related to the Removal and Trail of Tears.

One Dautzenlein Principle states: There is ALWAYS more to any dautzenlein than first meets the eye! This could not be more true than it is here, as the warnings and lessons of 1838  are echoed in today’s headlines.

The documented information in this report may affect you, as it did one person who reported, ” It shook me to my core!”

Order Paperback here.

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Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota

Vogt-Dautzenlein Research Report, available in paperback :

Color Cover

The Cherokee Removal, often referred to as the Trail of Tears, is one of the most complex, confusing, and heartbreaking periods of American history. While much has been written about it, much still remains a mystery. The exact locations of all but a few of the more than twenty Removal forts and posts have been lost to time. Consequently, most of the initial Trail of Tears routes taken by the Cherokee and the soldiers have also been lost.This report presents the latest information about two of the Trails connected to two Removal sites in Cherokee County, Georgia. The purpose of this report is: To document newly recovered historical information; present it, as found; and report the findings in an organized form. The report also proposes some hypotheses.The style of the report is designed to be a resource for researchers and still interesting to any “history nut”.

Order paperback report here.

 

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 The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona: the Sixes, Cherokee Mills, Little River Area of Cherokee County, Georgia

“Today, looking out across the broad expanse oaaaaaaaf the Lake Allatoona reservoir, most people just see a big lake. One might have difficulty imagining how this area looked before the dam was built, with the Little River flowing down to join the larger Etowah River at their confluence.  A confluence is the spot where two rivers meet and flow together. Lake Allatoona is formed by the dammed up waters of these two ancient, winding rivers. Down the Little River toward the Etowah River, just out a short distance from the ends of the docks behind Little River Grill,  is the former location of historic Cherokee Mills and its dam. On June 16, 1864, a Civil War skirmish took place just a few yards from here. The primary focus of this book covers a radius of about two miles from the central point where the two rivers still flow together, deep below the surface of Lake Allatoona. This is considered the “Sixes “ area, named for a Cherokee village once located here. Photos, illustrations and maps assist the reader to appreciate the area and its history. Order paperback here.


 

Dautzenleins: Making Sense of Things

Dautzenlein making sens of things .1 Look at something around you. Whatever you see, there is more to it than first meets the eye. There are “hidden” connections waiting to be discovered. Dautzenleins are these connections, the vehicles to unlock the doors of discovery and understanding.

Dautzenleins (pronounced “dots -n- lines”) are the connections of people or things, places, dates, and events.

Dautzenleins are invitations to look and see “what else” is around you; to discover the “dots and lines” that connect everything. Discovery makes life exciting! Whether one discovers a new person, place, or idea, or discovers another way to look at something, it leads to understanding. All of life and history is a continuing discovery of the Dautzenleins around us. This book presents the basics of a new way of viewing things so you can begin to understand and use the power of the Dautzenlein.  We are constantly impacted by people, things, places, and events of the past and present, and how they relate to each other and to us. Some of these relationships are easy to see, while others often go unseen, almost hidden, even though they are very relevant and intriguing pieces of the picture. If we view people, places, and artifacts as “Dots”, and view the rivers, roads, ideas, communications, and commerce as “Lines”, we can connect the “Dots” and “Lines” and discover some amazing and interesting aspects of history!  Our “Rule”: No dot exists without, at least, one line connected to it and no line exists without at least two dots connected to it. From the above rule, we see that the smallest Dautzenlein unit is: two dots connected by one line.  Discover any connection, and more dots and lines will begin to fall into place from there… just start connecting! Order  eBook Here.

Dautzenlein eBooks for smartphone, tablet, Kindle, or computer are available from Amazon.com. The books can be read on your device using their free downloadable reader applications found in the right hand column of the book order page. For more information about each books, click on “Order eBook here” links.

Check back or “Follow” us to find out when new books are released.

 

Continue reading our ongoing research and historical posts below. Thanks for browsing our Bookstore!

 

Trail of Tears: The Cherokee Removal

The Trail of Tears and the Removal of the Cherokee is a thread that is tightly woven throughout much of the history of Georgia. Northwest Georgia was formed directly from the lands of the original Cherokee Nation.

The term, “Trail of Tears”, has come to have several meanings. Most specifically, the Trail could be defined as the actual routes that displaced Native Americans traveled in order to get to the new reservations in Oklahoma. This is the definition we will be addressing in this post.

The term has also been used to include the whole series of events that led up to and culminated with the forced displacement of the Native American tribes of the southeastern United States during the 1830’s. We will use the term “Removal” when addressing this broader view of this historical period.

The sad details, events, and politics leading up to and surrounding the Removal have been subjects of much writing and debate.  Few people, then or now, believe that this chapter of our history was handled well. It was a most confusing, heartbreaking time and perhaps one of the darkest periods of American history.

We invite anyone unfamiliar with the Removal to spend some time reading about it and forming one’s own opinions about what happened and how it happened. Spend time viewing the events and elements of the Removal from each viewpoint, that of the Native American and that of the European American.

As much of our research and documentation centers in this area of the country, the subject of the Trail of Tears comes up often. There is an effort to designate the actual Trail and place historical markers along the way.

Where did the Trail start?

Technically it could be said to have started at the doorstep of each displaced person or family. It started in May of 1838, when small and large groups were forcibly gathered and led along existing roads and trails to centralized locations which were the Removal forts or encampments, set up to act as collection and departure points. Each fort or encampment had provision packets of blankets and food for those who were not otherwise prepared for the journey west to the “new” lands.

In Cherokee County, Georgia, the research for two of our books: The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona and The Curious Disappearance or Fort Buffington turned up some interesting information concerning the Trail. There were two Removal camps here: Fort Buffington, and the encampment or cantonment at Sixes. Removal camps were set up to be responsible for approximately a ten mile radius from each fort. There were relatively few roads and trails in the area at that time.

While we do not yet know the exact location of either camp, we can narrow their locations to within a mile or less and we do have maps and court records that indicate where the roads ran. With these sources at hand we can trace the routes that were available at that time.

By dautzenleining (connecting the dots) we can use the roads, fords, ferries, maps, and documentation to locate convergences and divergences of these elements and determine areas of high probability for routes and locations.

We know the locations of the ferries used to transport the Cherokee and soldiers across the main rivers here in Cherokee County. These ferries and the roads funneling to them could then be viewed as starting points in common for many along the Trail of the Tears.

 

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There are always two sides of every story.

We’ve all heard the old saying, “there are always two sides to every story”.  It’s a good saying and it usually has to do with some sort of disagreement.

More accurately it could be stated: “there are always at least two ways to view each Dautzenlein.” Since a Dautzenlein is the connection between two dots, the line can be viewed from either dot “toward” the other dot.  It is the view-point that changes – not the dots or lines.

In the new Dautzenlein Publications™ book, The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona, there is an observation about the old roads of the area.

Since early roads had no names, they were called things like “the road to Canton” or “the road to Marietta”. In this case, those two roads are the same road! They were named by what is at the other end of the road – from where one was standing, and in which direction one was going. The names got shortened and today we have “Canton Road” in Marietta and “Marietta Road” in Canton, even though the towns are 20 miles apart.

In Northwest Georgia, roads change names at least once every 5 or 10 miles. So two people can be talking about how to get somewhere and get totally bewildered looks on their faces until they realize they are talking about the same road that has different road names. Until that moment of recognition, they are in disagreement and confusion about how to get there. Then, all of a sudden there is complete agreement and understanding! It’s magical!

It would seem that disagreements could be viewed as Dautzenleins. If each “dot’s” viewpoint and underlying “intention” were observed and understood by the other dot, there may still be two different viewpoints but understanding would replace disagreement, and discussion replace discord.

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Introduction to Upcoming Book: “The Hidden History of Lake Allatoona, Cherokee County , Georgia” from Dautzenlein Publications

Our new book looks at one of the most history-rich spots in Northwest Georgia. The “Dots and Lines” of history found here, when connected, were found to span 10,000 years and connect all the way to California!

Some of the “Dots and Lines” are: Sixes, Cherokee Mills, McConnell’s Mill, Woodstock Culture, Gold Rush, Civil War, Little River, Etowah River, Lake Allatoona, Cherokee, Trail of Tears, Removal, Civil War skirmish.

Introduction:

 Dautzenlein Publications™:

Look at something around you.  Whatever you see, there’s more to it than what first meets the eye.  There are “hidden” connections waiting to be discovered. 

Dautzenleins are these connections, the vehicles to unlock the doors of discovery and understanding.

Dautzenleins {pronounced   “dots -‘n- lines” ) are the connections of people, places, dates, and events.

Dautzenlein books are invitations to look and see “what else” is around you; to discover the “dots and lines” that connect everything.

 Discovery makes life exciting!

Whether one discovers a new person, place, or idea; or discovers another way to look at something, it leads to understanding. All of life and history is a continuing discovery of the Dautzenleins around us.

*Dautzenleins – pronounced   “dots -‘n- lines” – are the connections of people, places, dates, and events.

Addendum at back of book:

The “Dots and Lines” of History.

We’ve all played the game “Connect the Dots” where a piece of paper has a large, random, group of numbered dots on it and when lines are drawn connecting the dots … a picture emerges. The simple “Rule” of that game is: Draw lines connecting the dots, in numerical order, starting with #1.

Had we been given the piece of paper and not known the “rule”, we might have carefully examine each dot on the page, individually, without connecting them with lines, without searching for the next dot to connect, and then wondered … what good is this?

History (and all of life) is like that piece of paper with many random dots on it… only the dots aren’t numbered! 

“NOT NUMBERED!!! How can we play the game and connect the dots if the dots aren’t numbered?”  Well, that’s a good question!

 We’ve heard the term “connecting the dots” which means to observe the elements of a situation or event, investigate their inter-connections, and discover the “real story” or the motivations surrounding the event so we can get the “big picture”.

History is the record and documentation of the people, places, and events of the past and how they relate to each other and to us. Some of these relationships are easy to see, while others often go unseen, even though they are very relevant and intriguing pieces of the picture.

If we view people, places, and artifacts as “Dots”, and view the rivers, roads, ideas, communications, and commerce as “Lines”, we can connect the “Dots” and “Lines” and discover some amazing and interesting aspects of history!

Our “Rule”: No dot exists without, at least, one line connected to it and no line exists without dots connected to it.

These connections serve as the “missing” numbers for each dot by connecting the dot to the next numberless dot.

Discover any connections… and more dots and lines will begin to fall into place from there… just start connecting!

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