PowerPoint Slides from “Decoding the Keyes Map” Presentation

We have no video or narration available from Tuesday’s meeting but we do have the PowerPoint slides for those of you who have been asking. They are somewhat self explanatory.

Click on link below and then click on first image to start the slide show, which is on a 10 second automatic cycle. The slides can be paused, replayed, etc.

*March 2019 note: The slide presentation has been deleted and the research is now available in the updated and expanded report, Trail of Tears Round-up Routes: Fort Buffington and Sixes Encampment to Fort Wool at New Echota, available here.

 

 

 

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Dautzenlein Updates: February 2018

It has been some time since our last post and much has happened! It is time to report briefly on two topics.

First, we have been working with Georgia Department of Transportation to provide them research and artifacts related to the possible site of Fort Buffington in Cherokee County, Georgia. We had the opportunity to meet and make formal presentations to GDOT personnel and their contractor on two occasions, and have had many informal consultations over the last 5 months.

Their report is due out later this spring with recommendations and conclusions related to the highway improvement and its impact on historical resources along the corridor.

Last summer, GDOT archaeologists ask us to stop any onsite research until their process was complete and we agreed. The result is that we have little new to report but would like to acknowledge their sincere interest and cooperation in preserving history.

Second, the “extra” time gleaned from our reduced, on-site research gave us time to re-visit the Trail of Tears Round-up routes, here in Cherokee County. As previously posted, our research has suggested different Cherokee Removal routes than those shown and described in National Park Service maps and reports.

We now believe we have the documentation and dautzenleins to make firm cases for both routes; the Fort Buffington and the Sixes Cantonment routes to Fort Wool at New Echota .

Stay tuned for the public announcement of the routes, sometime within the next few weeks!

 

 

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179th Anniversary of the Start of the Removal of the Cherokee Native Americans from Georgia

179 years ago today, the federalized Volunteer Georgia Militia began collecting the Cherokee for removal from Georgia. Countless elements came together to create this chapter of history.

Clashes of cultures have unfortunately been common throughout history on this planet. Our quest to find the site of Fort Buffington, a relic or artifact of such a clash,  is on-going and hopefully nearing its successful end.  Our motivation for finding this symbol is to preserve it and create an environment that fosters understandings of the factors that led to this troubling period of American history.

Our posting last May 25th is also still relevant. (Scroll down to read it)

Become Part of the “Fort Buffington Discovery Team”

Help us “Connect the Dots” in Cherokee County before the Highway Destroys them Forever!

Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in Cherokee County history.

Much of the early history of Cherokee County, Georgia happened along Cumming Highway (SR 20). Early on it was called “Alabama Road” and many small communities were located along the road. One notable community was the Buffington community, about five miles east of Canton. This community developed around a Cherokee Removal fort named Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the earliest forts built related to the “Removal” or “Trail of Tears”, as it was later called.  Its location has been lost for over 100 years but we believe it has been located.  A conclusive archaeological excavation could take years and we do not have time on our side… the Highway 20 Improvement Program will destroy the site before excavation could be completed.

There is a chance that other evidence is out there to confirm the site and you may have it in an old album or shoe-box!

It’s Simple!

Please review the two lists below.

The first list is a list of family names that go back as far as the 1820’s or 1830’s.

The other list is a list of places or things that may be mentioned in family papers, or early newspapers, or captured in old photographs that you or a family member may have tucked away.  These may have been passed down through the years even if your present family name is different than those listed. Your relative in Oregon, New York, or Minnesota might have something. It could even be something you purchased at a Yard Sale!

If you feel that you have anything related to these names or places, please contact us. Things that may seem insignificant to you could lead to a major break-through in connecting the dots and lines of Cherokee County history.

If you can connect a name from Column 1 with a reference to something from Column 2, you may have found a very special connection!

We look forward to hearing from you.

Email:  dautzenlein@aol.com

Go to:  dautzenlein.com

 


Family References

Buffington

Garrison

Thomas,   especially Jefferson Thomas

Moore

Tate

Wilson

Willson

Wilson and Cate

Wilbanks/Willbank

Perkins

Evans

Mullins

Posey

Maddox

Henson

Bagwell

Thrasher

Wood

Brewster

Reinhardt

McConnell

Donaldson

Cherokee

Places / Structures / Letters / Diaries/ Stories / Photographic References

“Old Fort”

“Indian Fort”

Fort Buffington

Buffington

Store

“Old Store”

Blacksmith

Post Office

Log cabin

Log house

Cemetery

Graveyard

Graves

Gin

Cotton Gin

Old Barn

Old Smokehouse

Old Shed

Harmony Church

“Old (Family) House”

Spring / Well

“Old Tree”

“Old Oak Tree”

Horse and Wagon

Horse and Building

Cherokee County, Georgia

“Cumming Highway”

“Orange Highway”

“Stockade”

Contacts us at: dautzenlein@aol.com  or leave a comment below. Include how we may contact you. Thank you!

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Hemorrhoids confirm historian’s hypothesis

How a tiny, “insignificant” Dot can “change a course” of history as it was known!

(A Dot in Dautzenlein lingo is a person, place, date, or event. Dautzenlein means “connecting the dots and lines”.)

Researchers are tasked with observing and revisiting information to discover more connections and other possibilities.

So often historians hear: “We really don’t have any significant information or relevant history handed down through our family.” or “All we have is an old letter or photo.”   To anyone who has historical documents, writings, maps, sketches, or photographs – please be aware that even the smallest thing can hold the biggest clue!

Here’s a true story about how extraordinary a mundane statement can be to a researcher.

In an appendix of John Latty’s book, Carrying off the Cherokee, there is a note about a soldier’s complaint that he got piles (hemorrhoids) while serving in the militia in June of 1838. Standing alone, this certainly adds some color to the drab palette of military records but that note dramatically adds a technicolor scene to our Dautzenlein research into the Trail of Tears as it relates to Fort Buffington.

Vogt-Dautzenlein has held that the Cherokee Trail of Tears from Fort Buffington to Fort Wool at New Echota took a different route than that proposed by the National Park Service and Trail of Tears Association, as shown on their maps and written in their descriptions.

This hypothesis was not taken very seriously as there was no known supporting evidence.  Vogt-Dautzenlein has now connected the dots, with evidence, from Fort Buffington to Donaldson’s Ferry and then to Waleska (see our earlier post and book) and NOW to Pine Log Town northwest of Waleska.

Thanks to this short “hemorrhoid” reference, a Fort Buffington solder, James Thrasher, is placed at Pine Log Town, about June 1, 1838. Since the Cherokee and their guards left Fort Buffington sometime between May 30 and June 2, it follows that Thrasher was probably on his way with the Cherokee to Fort Wool and that the course of the Trail ran through Pine Log Town after stopping near Waleska on the first night. The dots all connect!

In the grand scheme of things this does not alter the rotation of the earth on its axis but even seemingly inconsequential things can help connect some dots toward a fuller understanding of the Removal in North Georgia.

 

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Update on possible Fort Buffington site investigation

It has been a year since Vogt-Dautzenlein discovered the possible site of  Fort Buffington, in Cherokee County, Georgia.

Artifacts found, while consistent with the time period are not definitive by themselves, as daily life at a  volunteer militia frontier fort did not differ radically from that of most settlers. Removal forts were not heavily militarized since the Cherokee were not hostile. In some locales, the militia soldiers were not armed much more than a week before the collection action started. The volunteers were simply settlers who volunteered to serve under their local militia commanders. Most of Buffington’s outfit came from Hall County with some Cherokee County men volunteering once the post was established.

Landowners have granted permission to begin more extensive archaeological investigations that should lead to more definitive findings.

 

Vogt-Dautzenlein locates Historic Site believed to be Fort Buffington!

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Vogt-Dautzenlein Discovers Probable Location of Fort Buffington!

On August 23, 2015, documentary evidence was Dautzenleined (connected using Dautzenlein procedures) and it indicated a specific location. It is very exciting when Dautzenleins predict a location and it leads to discoveries!

Within two days, this location produced artifacts of the time period, type, and quantity to suggest that this is the probable site of the long lost Cherokee Removal fort – Fort Buffington.

Fort Buffington was one of the main forts along what is now called the Trail of Tears.

While the fort structure appears to have been relatively small, the site itself covers several acres and looks to have another adjoining “campus” possibly used by the Cherokee when they were collected for Removal.

Assuming this is the site, it clears up a lot of confusion that has existed about the fort and its location.

The sites and properties are privately owned by a number of individuals. No further information will be released at this time, as per landowners’ wishes.

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